Mapije de Wit

This does not look safe.

An art project in Utrecht has come up with a more literal spin on the "share" part of bike sharing -- let someone use the back of your bike, and come along for the ride, by picking up a cycle hitchhiker.

Dutch artist Mapije de Wit, in collaboration with the Dutch Cyclist's Union, placed six signs around the city's central train station earlier this month, inviting pedestrians to stick out their thumbs and hitch a ride on passing bicycles. The "social experiment" was meant to encourage urban cyclists to be friendlier and more communal.

Though the signs called these "official" bike hitchhiking spots, they were actually far from official. The city of Utrecht has decided to take down the signs, which were illegally installed on street signs.

There seemed to be a few other problems with the concept, too. Balancing on a bike rack isn't all that easy or safe. And, for those nice enough to offer a ride, lugging around another person on your bike just sounds kind of hard.

(h/t PSFK)

All images courtesy of Mapije de Wit.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. A sign outside a storefront in Buffalo, New York.
    Environment

    Will Buffalo Become a Climate Change Haven?

    The Western New York city possesses a distinct mix of weather, geography, and infrastructure that could make it a potential climate haven. But for whom?

  2. photo: A vacant home in Oakland that is about to demolished for an apartment complex.
    Equity

    Fix California's Housing Crisis, Activists Say. But Which One?

    As a controversy over unoccupied homes in the Bay Area and Los Angeles reveals, advocates disagree about what kind of housing should be built, and where.

  3. photo: a high-speed train in Switzerland
    Transportation

    The Case for Portland-to-Vancouver High-Speed Rail

    At the Cascadia Rail Summit outside Seattle, a fledgling scheme to bring high-speed rail from Portland to Vancouver found an enthusiastic reception.

  4. A syringe sits on top of a car. Houses are behind it.
    Life

    The Changing Geography of the Opioid Crisis

    A new study shows that the country faces different opioid challenges in urban and rural areas.

  5. A photo of a police officer in El Paso, Texas.
    Equity

    What New Research Says About Race and Police Shootings

    Two new studies have revived the long-running debate over how police respond to white criminal suspects versus African Americans.

×