Mapije de Wit

This does not look safe.

An art project in Utrecht has come up with a more literal spin on the "share" part of bike sharing -- let someone use the back of your bike, and come along for the ride, by picking up a cycle hitchhiker.

Dutch artist Mapije de Wit, in collaboration with the Dutch Cyclist's Union, placed six signs around the city's central train station earlier this month, inviting pedestrians to stick out their thumbs and hitch a ride on passing bicycles. The "social experiment" was meant to encourage urban cyclists to be friendlier and more communal.

Though the signs called these "official" bike hitchhiking spots, they were actually far from official. The city of Utrecht has decided to take down the signs, which were illegally installed on street signs.

There seemed to be a few other problems with the concept, too. Balancing on a bike rack isn't all that easy or safe. And, for those nice enough to offer a ride, lugging around another person on your bike just sounds kind of hard.

(h/t PSFK)

All images courtesy of Mapije de Wit.

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