Because Rob Ford.

Earlier this morning, Toronto Mayor Rob Ford defeated former pro-wrestler Hulk Hogan in an arm-wrestling match at the Toronto convention center during "Fan Expo," the Comic-Con of Canada. 

Ford struggled at the beginning of the match, but eventually managed to gain the upper hand. After claiming victory, he jumped up, both arms in the air, reveling in his most recent job perk.

Here's the very short match, captured on video by one spectator:

The local media, who are perhaps resigned to the Ford administration serving solely a source of amusement from here on out, tweeted the entire event as it happened:

Afterwards, one journalist hoped they could get Hogan's take on the mysterious crack video but got nothing:

Hogan though, says Ford is a natural fit for the world of wrestling:

While the event was meant to be lighthearted, not everyone in Toronto enjoyed the latest example of Ford turning himself (and some feel, the whole city) into an international source of cheap amusement: 

It has been 99 days since news first broke of the existence of a video allegedly showing the mayor smoking crack cocaine.

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