Reuters

Because college kids are dumb.

In case you haven't seen it yet (more power to you), Miley Cyrus followed up the world's most famous twerk with a new music video for her single "Wrecking Ball." In it, she sways back and forth, often naked, on top of a giant wrecking ball. Not surprisingly, people have taken notice. The official video was viewed over 100 million times this month.

Students at Grand Valley State University in Allendale, Michigan, have taken the video particularly to heart. They have a wrecking ball of their own, you see. And they've started climbing on it in order to ... connect with their inner Miley, we guess? Because, culture?

The school put the sculpture in storage on September 17 due to "safety concerns." The nearly 20-year old piece, by Dale Eldred, has spent most of its life swinging quietly back and forth like a pendulum, much like in the music video. Now, it'll never be the same.

According to the Los Angeles Times, the school's associate vice president of facilities services says that "the sculpture was removed so structural integrity could be reviewed." Probably because the school, or artist, never imagined that jumping on and riding a 42-inch steel ball swinging from a 50-foot cable would become a thing.

They did not anticipate the all-consuming, Miley Cyrus-run world we live in today. 

Don't think that GVSU's students are the least bit okay with having their wrecking ball removed. Quickly after the piece was taken away, students protested, gathering in front of where the wrecking ball once swung and demanding it be reinstalled. 

Some professors even managed to turn this into a teaching moment. RIP Wrecking ball.

Top image: Singer Miley Cyrus performs "We Can't Stop" during the 2013 MTV Video Music Awards in New York August 25, 2013. (REUTERS/Lucas Jackson)

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