A timelapse video shows Manhattan's tallest building emerge.

Today's Postcard comes from lower Manhattan, a place on many minds today, the 12th anniversary of the September 11 terrorist attacks.

One World Trade Center is a 1,776-foot tall skyscraper set to open on the ground once occupied by the Twin Towers in 2015. Designed by David Childs of SOM, the estimated $3.9 billion project will include a 65-foot high main lobby. Offices will start at the 20th floor; they will be interrupted by a "sky lobby" on the 64th with office space resuming from floors 65 to 90. An observation deck will be located on floors 100 through 102. Floors 91-99 as well as 103 and 104 (the building's top two floors) will be designated for mechanical space. Unlike original plans (and the Twin Towers), there will be no top floor restaurant. 

EarthCam, which provides webcam footage of construction sites all over the country, released a time lapse video yesterday of the new skyscraper being built since construction started in 2006:

But since September 11 is a day to look back, here's a film of Yamasaki's Twin Towers as well, a 1983 film made by the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey titled "Building The World Trade Center." In it, the film explains and celebrates the achievement of building the original World Trade Center, an ambitious construction project that came with its own complicated web of political and engineering issues before becoming a defining city landmark during its short life:   

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