Glorious snapshots from the annual competition in Southern California.

Surfing canines took the spotlight at the fifth annual Surf City Surf Dog competition in Huntington Beach, California, yesterday.

The dogs, dubbed "sur-furs," competed in four different weight classes, ranging from 20 pounds to over 60 pounds. There was also a special "tandem" category, where the plus-one is either the owner or a second dog. Canine competitors were awarded big points for standing on all fours and for completing the longest or biggest rides.

In the following photos, see how the brave sur-furs got on their boards with the help of their owners and eventually wiped out on their own.

(REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson)
(REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson)
(REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson)
(REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson)
(REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson)
(REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson)
(REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson)
(REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson)
(REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson)
(REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson)

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