One of America's most iconic bridges, letter by letter.

It took 13 years to build the iconic Brooklyn Bridge. And it took Sarasota, Florida-based designer Cameron Moll three years of painstaking research and design work to re-imagine it in this intricate illustration, composed entirely of type.

Moll had already completed typeface illustrations of the Roman Coliseum and the Salt Lake Temple, but the expansive and complex Brooklyn Bridge (I's and A's for the arches, and M's and H's to cap off the cornices) has proven his biggest challenge to date. The video below, which shows a sample of the work (rapidly sped up) gives a sense of just how exacting this process was.

In creating the drawing, Moll tried to capture some of the history behind the bridge. After consulting with New York-based Bowne & Company Stationers, he chose two fonts that would have been in use at the time of its construction: Antique Triple Extra Condensed and Fette Gottisch, a German typeface in honor of chief designer John Roebling's birth country.

Other Easter eggs are hidden in the typeface of the work, including the names of John Roebling and his son Washington:

And the last names of the men who died during the construction process:

To raise money and organize orders for a first print run, Moll launched a Kickstarter on Oct. 10. He had already more than tripled his original $10,000 goal by midday Monday. Both the $80 and $90 options for signed copies are all sold out, but $100 can still reserve you a print. Watch more of Moll at work, and see some of the finished product, in his video below:

All images and video via Kickstarter.

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