It’s like an architectural interpretation of Dalí.

The façade of a house in an English seaside town has peeled away and slid right onto the street.

British designer Alex Chinneck removed the front of a dilapidated four-story house in Margate, England, and replaced it with a new front that "slips down" to meet the ground. Chinneck spent a year convincing companies to sponsor materials for the installation. It took just six weeks to assemble everything from prefabricated panels.

The once-derelict house, with broken windows and overgrown weeds, has been acquired by the local council but it won’t be turned into public housing for another year. According to Dezeen, the house is located in Cliftonville, an area of Margate struggling with high crime rates and deteriorating architecture. Chinneck hopes his project draws visitors from the center of town.

Correction: An earlier version of this post included a video that has since then been removed by its owner. We’ll add it back if it resurfaces.

All images are screenshots from House with slipped down facade, Margate by Dezeen. 

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