Ostalgie taken to a whole other level.

In Frauenwald, Germany (population: 989), there's a museum inside an old military bunker leftover from GDR times. Rather than simply perusing the Soviet-era tchotchkes, why not slip on an old military uniform, line up with fellow pretend comrades in front of your pretend commander and salute a portrait of old General Secretary Honecker? 

For $150, you can. Built in the 1970s to shelter a district command unit of the East Germany National People's Army in emergencies, the 39,000-square-foot bunker (now known as the Bunker-Museum) provides visitors the chance to actually live like an East German solider (gas masks included).

The 16-hour experience is a lighthearted one (though yelling, bed checks and sirens are included). Reuters photographer Ina Fassbender recently visited the facility to capture the most intense 16 hours of Ostalgie money can buy:

Thomas Krueger, dressed as NVA major, speaks to participants of the 'reality event' one night at the 'Bunker-Museum' October 12, 2013. (REUTERS/Ina Fassbender) 
A flag of the former DDR (abbreviation of former East Germany) is pictured at the 'Bunker-Museum' October 12, 2013. (REUTERS/Ina Fassbender)
Thomas Krueger dressed as NVA major talks to his guests at their arrival for one night at the 'Bunker-Museum' October 12, 2013. (REUTERS/Ina Fassbender)
The former NVA identity card of Hans-Georg Tiede before the 'reality event' one night at the 'Bunker-Museum' October 12, 2013. (REUTERS/Ina Fassbender) 
65 year-old Hans-Georg Tiede presents his original identity mark of the former DDR at his arrival for one night at the 'Bunker-Museum' October 12, 2013. (REUTERS/Ina Fassbender) 
Family Hoppmann poses in the sleeping room of the 'Bunker-Museum' October 12, 2013. (REUTERS/Ina Fassbender)
37 year-old Andrea Friebe, who works as fitness coach, dressed in a NVA soldier uniform, poses during her 'reality event' at the 'Bunker-Museum' October 12, 2013. (REUTERS/Ina Fassbender) 
Participants dressed as NVA soldiers look at weapons during the 'reality event' one night at the 'Bunker-Museum' October 12, 2013.  (REUTERS/Ina Fassbender) 
A couple dressed as NVA soldiers look at photos at the 'Bunker-Museum' October 12, 2013. (REUTERS/Ina Fassbender)
A Trabant car is pictured at the 'Bunker-Museum' October 12, 2013. (REUTERS/Ina Fassbender)
Headphones and a NVA helmet are seen on a styrofoam head at the 'Bunker-Museum' October 12, 2013. (REUTERS/Ina Fassbender)
A dummy sits at a table with typewriters at the 'Bunker-Museum' October 12, 2013. (REUTERS/Ina Fassbender) 
A couple dressed as NVA soldiers look at photos at the 'Bunker-Museum' October 12, 2013. (REUTERS/Ina Fassbender)
The telephone exchange room is pictured at the 'Bunker-Museum' October 12, 2013. (REUTERS/Ina Fassbender)
A paper with text written on it that reads "Dear friends of the bunker. We are happy that you are here tonight" is seen during the 'reality event' one night at the 'Bunker-Museum' October 12, 2013. (REUTERS/Ina Fassbender) 
A photo of former DDR (abbreviation of former East Germany) leader Erich Honecker is pictured at the 'Bunker-Museum' October 12, 2013. (REUTERS/Ina Fassbender)
Glass tubes to control the contamination of the chemical poison Sarin is seen at the 'Bunker-Museum' October 12, 2013. (REUTERS/Ina Fassbender)
A dining room is pictured at the 'Bunker-Museum' October 12, 2013. (REUTERS/Ina Fassbender)
Thomas Krueger, dressed as NVA major, waits for participants for an appeal during the 'reality event' one night at the 'Bunker-Museum' October 12, 2013. (REUTERS/Ina Fassbender) 
A combination picture showing various canned food (L to R top row) a can with whole meal bread, tomato sauce for school kitchens and original cans with goulash of pork (L to R bottom row) tins of NVA soup, sign of the former Republic DDR and various cans with different labels all with filled sausages is seen at the 'Bunker-Museum' October 12, 2013. (REUTERS/Ina Fassbender) 
Woman dressed in NVA soldier uniforms prepare the dinner during the 'reality event' for one night at the 'Bunker-Museum' October 12, 2013. (REUTERS/Ina Fassbender)
Members of the Hoppmann family wear gas masks during the 'reality event' one night at the 'Bunker-Museum' October 12, 2013. (REUTERS/Ina Fassbender) 
Marco, dressed as NVA officer, inspects the bunker during the 'reality event' one night at the 'Bunker-Museum' October 12, 2013. (REUTERS/Ina Fassbender)
Thomas Krueger dressed as a NVA major waits outside the 'Bunker-Museum' October 12, 2013. (REUTERS/Ina Fassbender)
A man dressed as NVA major talks to the participants of the 'reality event' one night at the 'Bunker-Museum' October 12, 2013. (REUTERS/Ina Fassbender)
Participants of the 'reality event' one night sleep in a room of the 'Bunker-Museum' October 12, 2013. (REUTERS/Ina Fassbender)

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