Plastic Jesus has a simple message: stop making stupid people famous.

In a series of new interventions, street artist Plastic Jesus is sending a clear message to Los Angeles: Stop making stupid people famous.

The artist has been complaining about "celebrities with little talent and questionable intelligence" for years. He finally took action three months ago, creating a stencil. This month, he began amplifying that message, posting it on stop signs and even roads.

Plastic Jesus is not sure about the true origins of the phrase. The artist is, however, beyond certain that people connect with the message -- which has also been reproduced on t-shirts. "Every time I wear one of my t-shirts I get multiple comments from passersby," he writes in an email.

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