Bauhaus Dessau Foundation

The interior design is, as expected, wonderfully minimalist.

Bauhaus, the famed German design school that changed the face of modern design (and also came up with some amazing chairs), now invites visitors to a much more intimate experience with the critical 20th century cultural movement.

Starting this month, "The Studio Building" at Bauhaus’ Dessau campus will be up for rent. For €35-60 (about $50-80) a night, visitors can stay in one of the 28 rooms that once housed "junior masters and promising students."

One of the rooms has been accurately reconstructed with original objects and furniture. The rest will be furnished to reflect previous inhabitants like Alfred Arndt and Franz Ehrlich.

The school welcomes you to "spend the night like a Bauhausler,*" where the asterisk means "communal showers and restrooms in the hallway, like back in Bauhaus days."

(h/t Dezeen)

All images courtesy of Bauhaus Dessau Foundation

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