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On day 23 of his month-long graffiti spree, the heat finally convinced Banksy to stay home. 

New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg once called the NYPD the "seventh biggest army in the world." With all those troops, and thousands of surveillance cameras, it's a bit of a surprise the department can't catch one graffiti artist.

But they may be getting closer. Today, the elusive Banksy announced on Instagram, where he's been cataloging his month-long residency in NYC, that he wouldn't be unveiling anything new on October 23 due to "police activity." 

Obviously, we don't know exactly what that means. (Who knows? Maybe this is just today's piece of art).

As Zach Schonfeld at The Atlantic Wire pointed out last week, the NYPD has orders from Bloomberg to catch Banksy, but can't, because they don't know what he looks like. In 2008, The Daily Mail claimed to have identified him, but concluded their report with a disclaimer: "Given Banksy's long-standing success at covering his tracks, there is, of course, the possibility that the trail we have been following is a red herring, a complex set-up."

Top image: Banksy painting from Oct. 21/Instagram.

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