A photographer figures out how to infuse Ryazan with a "new emotion."

Denis Khripyakov has a way of making Ryazan, Russia, look a lot more exciting than it appears at first glance.

The low-key city is 125 miles southeast of Moscow, and in many ways it's the capital city's opposite. Ryazan's population of 525,000 has held steady since the fall of the USSR. Its economy is mostly centered on oil and electronics; wooded areas, railroads, old houses, and Soviet-era apartment blocks dot the landscape.

But Khripyakov infuses these scenes with new life by blending them together to create a mirror effect. The results are often stunning, giving viewers not only a sense of what it feels like to wander around Ryazan, but how the 25-year old Khripyakov sees his city, the final product conveying what he calls "a new emotion."

Below, some of our favorite shots.

All images courtesy Denis Khripyakov

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Videos

    5 Ways to Seriously Battle Traffic

    So long as cars are among us, road pricing, ramp meters, diamond-shaped intersections can mitigate horrendous commutes, a new video explains.

  2. Design

    The Rivers of the U.S., Collected Into a Nifty Subway Map

    A designer who spent his youth floating on rafts has conjured up a delightful transit guide to America’s waterways.

  3. An empty storefront on a sidewalk with a "retail space for lease" sign in the window
    Life

    How Cities Can Save Small Shops

    Some places are already taking action, but New York City is lagging behind. Here’s a blueprint for keeping local retail healthy.

  4. Transportation

    5 Reasons to Be Wary of Elon Musk's Hyperloop

    High-speed vactrains might be the ticket for a Martian colony. As a practical transit investment for Earth, the technology has a long way to go.

  5. An illustration of a grid of canned food
    Equity

    What's the Matter With Little Free Food Pantries?

    They highlight food insecurity, without doing much to take a bite out of it.