A photographer figures out how to infuse Ryazan with a "new emotion."

Denis Khripyakov has a way of making Ryazan, Russia, look a lot more exciting than it appears at first glance.

The low-key city is 125 miles southeast of Moscow, and in many ways it's the capital city's opposite. Ryazan's population of 525,000 has held steady since the fall of the USSR. Its economy is mostly centered on oil and electronics; wooded areas, railroads, old houses, and Soviet-era apartment blocks dot the landscape.

But Khripyakov infuses these scenes with new life by blending them together to create a mirror effect. The results are often stunning, giving viewers not only a sense of what it feels like to wander around Ryazan, but how the 25-year old Khripyakov sees his city, the final product conveying what he calls "a new emotion."

Below, some of our favorite shots.

All images courtesy Denis Khripyakov

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