Festivities for a rubber duck Friday, and a man jumping off the bridge (safely) with joy last night.

It's been a busy few days on and around Pittsburgh's Clemente Bridge. 

Florentijn Hofman's giant rubber duck made its way into the city Friday night, drawing thousands of onlookers as it floated towards the bridge before stationing itself at nearby Point State Park (where it'll stay until October 20). While the duck passed by, the bridge was closed off to vehicles for a "Rubber Duck Bridge Party."

Last night, Pittsburgh's baseball team, the Pirates, made their first playoff appearance since 1992. Thanks to its close proximity to PNC Park, the bridge (named after one of the Pirates's most celebrated former players) turned into a makeshift, free viewing area for fans who couldn't get tickets to the sold-out game. Fans partied on the bridge after the game, culminating with a fan jumping 40 feet into the Allegheny river (he was not injured).

Below, a look at the recent organized and not-so-organized festivities along the Clemente Bridge since Friday:

A 40-foot-high and 30-foot-wide inflatable rubber duck, created by Dutch artist Florentijn Hofman, is towed up the Allegheny River in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania September 27, 2013. The event marks the North American debut of Hofman's Rubber Duck Project, which has taken place in other cities in Asia, Europe, Australia and South America. (REUTERS/Jason Cohn) 
Thousands of people line both sides of the Allegheny River as a version of Dutch artist Florentijn Hofman giant "Rubber Duckie" is towed past PNC Park for its debut in Pittsburgh on Friday, Sept. 27, 2013. Pittsburgh's duck is the first "Made-in-the-USA" version of the Dutch artists creation. The ducks arrival kicks off the month-long Pittsburgh International Festival of Firsts, which features theater, dance, music and visual arts from around the world. After the opening night the duck will be moored downtown until Oct. 20, 2013. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic)
Some of the thousands of people that crowded downtown Pittsburgh line the Roberto Clemente Bridge over the Allegheny River as they watch a version of Dutch artist Florentijn Hofman giant "Rubber Duckie" being positioned on the river for its debut in Pittsburgh on Friday, Sept. 27, 2013. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic)
Pittsburgh Pirates President Frank Coonely, left, greets fans as they cross the Roberto Clemente Bridge before the NL wild-card playoff baseball game between the Cincinnati Reds and the Pittsburgh Pirates on Tuesday, Oct. 1, 2013, in Pittsburgh. (AP Photo/Don Wright)
People cross the Roberto Clemente Bridge on their way to the NL wild-card playoff baseball game between the Pittsburgh Pirates and the Cincinnati Reds on Tuesday, Oct. 1, 2013, in Pittsburgh. The Pirates were making their first post-season appearance since 1992. (AP Photo/Don Wright)
Derek Buck, of Pittsburgh, waves a Jolly Roger flag as he stands on the Roberto Clemente Bridge as fans make their way to the NL wild-card playoff baseball game between the Pittsburgh Pirates and the Cincinnati Reds on Tuesday, Oct. 1, 2013. (AP Photo/Don Wright)

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