Embarrassed by the lackluster score posted on your front window? Just add a 'R-U-N-C-H'!

Harlem's Astor Row Cafe has figured out a clever way to camouflage the 'B' rating it received from city health inspectors. By supplying additional letters to spell out "SUNDAY BRUNCH," the off-putting inspection sign now helps promote one of the cafe's main attractions.

This move is especially amusing given Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s recent warning to New Yorkers: don’t eat in a restaurant unless they have an 'A.'

Heeding Bloomberg’s advice would eliminate about 4,500 options in the city. Andrew Moesel from the New York Restaurant Association has said that many low grades result from minor infractions unrelated to food.

But despite the cafe's creativity (and not-too-shabby 4-star rating on Yelp), diners might want to think twice. As seen in the screenshot below, Astor Row earned its 'B' for improper refrigeration, evidence of mice on the premises, and unhygienic food contact surfaces.

Screenshot of Astor Row’s entry in New York City’s restaurant inspection database.

Cafe employee Armando Burgos told The New York Daily News that passersby think "it’s funny." But potential customers beware -- before you eat, make sure you're in on the joke.

(h/t New York Daily News)  

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