Over the top, yes, but also pretty fun.

You can build almost anything with LEGOs, but one Canadian photographer used the colorful bricks to poke some good-natured fun at his U.S. neighbors.

For Jeff Friesen, what started out as playtime with his 7-year-old daughter is now an impressive collection of 50 LEGO creations that "capture" all 50 U.S. states.

From the coffee mania of Washington to the crocodiles and retirees of Florida, these whimsical LEGO scenes highlight the quirks (or stereotypes) of each state. Look closely and you might spot some subtle touches, like the parachute on a LEGO man in the Kansas setup. “He’s just a dude who’s used to all the tornadoes so he always wears a parachute around the house,” Friesen told Wired.

Here’s a selection, along with Friesen’s original captions.
 
Arizona  -- Good fences make good neighbors?
California -- Moonbeam’s mellow is never harshed by her Fruitfly brand compost-powered tri-scoot.
Oregon -- Only organic free-range chickens run amuck at the FreeBird food truck. Just don’t get pecked when you pluck.
Washington -- We can only close our eyes using clothespins.
New Mexico -- People tend to shy away from probing questions in the land of enchantment.
Kansas --There’s no place like home, but if your home is frequently blown aloft it helps to wear a parachute indoors.


Ohio -- They may be pests to presidential candidates but kids love living in a swing state.


Iowa -- Every summer you seen them emerging bright yellow from their green jackets: the children of the corn.


Florida -- Reptilian life-forms rule the beaches of Florida. Luckily, most are slow moving.

Delaware -- Inspired by the title of Emanuel Leutze’s famous painting, Washington Crosses “The Delaware.”

Check out all 50 states at Friesen’s project page.  

(h/t Wired)

All images courtesy of Jeff Friesen. 

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