The timing is pretty awful for Brazil's turn at hosting the 2014 World Cup games this summer.

At least three people have died in an accident at the Sao Paulo stadium due to host the World Cup opener in 2014. From reports, it looks like a fallen crane may have caused a partial collapse of the stadium's stands.

There's not a ton of information out there right now on what exactly happened, but the timing is pretty awful for Brazil's turn at hosting the 2014 World Cup games this summer. There are 12 venues in all for next year's games, and FIFA set a December deadline for the completion of those facilities. Brazil was already struggling to meet that deadline. At the time of the collapse, the Sao Paulo stadium was 94 percent completed.

Here's a picture that apparently shows the partial collapse from above: 

This is what the stadium looked like in August:

Reuters

Brazil (Rio de Janeiro, specifically) is also slated to host the Summer Olympics in 2016.

This post originally appeared on The Wire.

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