Tom Ryaboi

These may trigger a latent fear of heights.

Tom Ryaboi is a photographer who revels in exposing the conventional urban landscape from above. Ryaboi, a veteran of "rooftopping" photography, has been taking these vertigo-inducing shots from fantastically high heights since 2007, both in his native Toronto and beyond (our own Eric Jaffe interviewed him about last year).

Ryaboi recently added a new set of daring images to his Rooftopping series. These incorporate many of the friends who joined him on urban climbing adventures. Their silhouettes are set off against the expansive skyline. The photographs highlight the sense of adventure, and the guts necessary to snap these unusual images.

"It was important to include people in my photos because they are the real story here. The cities are beautiful, but how we use them is much more relevant," Ryaboi writes in an email.

Ryaboi explains that the new images capture the mindset that lies behind the rooftopping culture is, one that is far more about seeking "genuine experiences" than pure thrill. (Though it's clear that there is a lot of danger being sought here -- both from the dizzying heights and from the challenge of sneaking onto these off-limits roofs).

But for Ryaboi, these images are about learning to interact with your immediate surroundings as "a place full of wonder and adventure." He writes, "What we have found up/on/in these spaces is a piece of ourselves that -- many of us -- didn't know we had. A free spirit that seeks out real adventure, curious to know what's behind the flimsy curtain."

Check out more shots of Toronto's rooftoppers in action below:

(h/t My Modern Met)

All images courtesy Tom Ryaboi.

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