Stay warm without giving up your phone.

Winter is coming, and a group of Canadians are on a mission to keep phones and their users warm.

Behold Tahka, a portable cocoon for your smartphone addiction. Spearheaded by proud Canadian Mina Mais, Tahka is made of waterproof nylon on the outside and polar fleece on the inside. There’s also an area of clear plastic coated with anti-fog agents, for an unobstructed view of the phone. Texting while waiting for the bus in the cold doesn't have to be a torture.

The early bird price for a Tahka is $49 on Kickstarter. But for $9 more, you can get a handy talisman, shown above. Tahka is a perfectly functional concept, once you get over the fact that it exists.

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