An inspirational short film captures the therapeutic power of running.

London-based filmmakers Matan Rochlitz and Ivo Gormley wanted to find out if people are more open when they're running.

So the pair went around London's Victoria Park, interviewing early-morning joggers. The filmmakers quickly discovered an effective conversation-starter: why are you running here? Before long, joggers were revealing intimate thoughts on tough topics like love, sex, depression, and dementia.

In a piece for the Guardian, the filmmakers explain their work in detail and offer a satisfying conclusion:

These questions (Are you in love? Who do you care about most? What do you want to do with your life?) are hard to ask and are not often answered sincerely. Through their steps, their breaths and their focus, runners can answer them.

Watch the film below. 

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