Reuters

A case study in globalization.

Popular hazelnut and cocoa spread Nutella has become such a global product that the OECD decided to use it as a case study in its latest report on global value chains.

Some 250,000 tons of Nutella are now sold across 75 countries around the world every year, according to the OECD. But that's not what's amazing about it. Nutella, it turns out, is a perfect example of what globalization has meant for popular foodstuffs: Not only is it sold everywhere, but its ingredients are sourced from all over the place too.

Even though Ferrero International, which makes the stuff, is headquartered in Italy, it has factories in Europe, Russia, North America and South America. And while certain inputs are supplied locally — like, say, the plastic for the bottles or milk — many others are shipped from all over the world. The hazelnuts are from Turkey; the palm oil is from Malaysia; the cocoa is from Nigeria; the sugar is from either Brazil or Europe; and the vanilla flavoring is from France.
 
The OECD mapped it all out. Have a look:
Nutella Map
This post originally appeared on Quartz, an Atlantic partner site.

 

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