Wikimedia Commons

It's one of only 6,000 copies printed.

Cleveland librarian Kelly Brown had far more modest plans when she first began collecting items for a holiday traditions display at the Cleveland Public Library. But when she began poking around the stacks, she stumbled on a fairly unexpected Yuletide surprise: a first-edition copy of Charles Dickens' A Christmas Carol.

The leather-bound book, donated at one point but soon forgotten about, is one of only 6,000 first-run copies printed on Dec. 17, 1843. At the time, it cost a modest 5 shillings. In the last few years, first editions have sold at auction for several thousand dollars.

The newly discovered first edition may have been too valuable to make it into the library's final display, but curious visitors can go visit the rare book in the library's special collections department. "The Cleveland Public Library is a library, not a museum, so you actually could come here and sit with it if you wanted to," Brown told Cleveland's Fox 8.

Watch the full report from Cleveland's Fox 8, below:

(h/t Cleveland Scene)

Top Image: Title page of the first edition of A Christmas Carol. In Prose. Being a Ghost Story of Christmas. Illustrated by John Leech. (Wikimedia Commons/Heritage Auctions).

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