Much kissing ensued.

A "Mistletoe Drone" descended on San Francisco’s Union Square earlier this week. And as you can see in this video, the result was a whole lot of kissing couples.

It's a collaboration between artist George Zisiadis and Mustafa Khan, and uses a Parrot AR Drone 2.0.

Zisiadis, who recently completed an interactive sidewalk installation in Boston, writes in an email:

All the couples kissing were complete strangers to us ... [The Mistletoe Drone] immediately sparked their playfulness and soon people were lining up to kiss.

The project was also an effort to challenge how people perceive unmanned aircraft. Zisiadis told the Bold Italic, "Drones have been causing all sorts of paranoia lately and I wanted to re-frame them from being something scary and ominous to being fun and human -- It’s not about the technology, its about how we use it."

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