SrirachaFilm/Facebook

An anthem for hot sauce lovers.   

Last month, a court ordered the partial shutdown of a Sriracha hot sauce factory in Irwindale, California. That move left the world in a panic -- are supply shortages coming? Price hikes?

In case you find yourself in need of a Sriracha fix, we turn your attention to a new documentary. The film, released today, reveals the origin of Sriracha and offers fresh insights into the magical "rooster sauce."

Filmmaker Griffin Hammond stands among the jalapeño plants grown for producing Sriracha. (image via the film's Kickstarter)
Sriracha was named after Si Racha, Thailand, where the hot sauce originated. (screenshot from trailer)

After a successful Kickstarter campaign in July, filmmaker Griffin Hammond spent the past half-year producing what he calls "an anthem for Sriracha lovers." He traveled from the sizzling Sriracha factories in California to the eponymous town of Si Racha, Thailand, exploring the mind-blowing extent of the sauce's success.

The 33-minute film made its online debut today, available for $5 through Vimeo.

Check out the trailer below.  

Top image via SrirachaFilm on Facebook.  

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