Turning the traditional umbrella upside down can keep you dry in more places.

These days, gadgets get upgraded left and right. The umbrella, however, has remained surprisingly impervious to change.

Not for long.

Japanese designer Hiroshi Kajimoto has flipped the umbrella upside down. The result? An UnBRELLA, which cleverly inverts the traditional opening mechanism. 

all images courtesy of h concept

Since the UnBrella collapses the wet surface inward, your pants won't get wet when rushing from the downpour into crowded places like the subway. Plus, when it's folded up, it can stand up by itself.

But gathering moisture on the inside could get swampy and gross quickly. The UnBRELLA also won’t come cheap -- it’s slated to go on sale in February 2014 at 9450 yen, or about $92.  

For those who just can’t get past the funny-looking wire frames up top the UnBRELLA, there is another option. A designer recently unveiled a very similar inverted umbrella that simply puts a cover over the structural support. 

Watch demos of both products below.


h concept's UnBRELLA 


Ilmo Ahn's "Inverted Umbrella" 

(h/t The Verge)

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. photo: a commuter looks at a small map of the London Tube in 2009
    Maps

    Help! The London Tube Map Is Out of Control.

    It’s never been easy to design a map of the city’s underground transit network. But soon, critics say, legibility concerns will demand a new look.

  2. Transportation

    How Media Coverage of Car Crashes Downplays the Role of Drivers

    Safety advocates have long complained that media outlets tend to blame pedestrians and cyclists who are hit by cars. Research suggests they’re right.

  3. photo: a Tower Records Japan Inc. store in Tokyo, Japan.
    Life

    The Bankrupt American Brands Still Thriving in Japan

    Cultural cachet, licensing deals, and density explain why Toys ‘R’ Us, Tower Records, Barneys, and other faded U.S. retailers remain big across the Pacific.

  4. Life

    Suburban Jobs Are Growing Fastest, But Urban Jobs Pay More

    New labor data show that the suburbs have the fastest job growth in the U.S. But we shouldn’t assume the future of employment will be suburban.

  5. photo: A vacant home in Oakland that is about to demolished for an apartment complex.
    Equity

    Fix California’s Housing Crisis, Activists Say. But Which One?

    As a controversy over vacancy in the Bay Area and Los Angeles reveals, advocates disagree about what kind of housing should be built, and where.

×