Turning the traditional umbrella upside down can keep you dry in more places.

These days, gadgets get upgraded left and right. The umbrella, however, has remained surprisingly impervious to change.

Not for long.

Japanese designer Hiroshi Kajimoto has flipped the umbrella upside down. The result? An UnBRELLA, which cleverly inverts the traditional opening mechanism. 

all images courtesy of h concept

Since the UnBrella collapses the wet surface inward, your pants won't get wet when rushing from the downpour into crowded places like the subway. Plus, when it's folded up, it can stand up by itself.

But gathering moisture on the inside could get swampy and gross quickly. The UnBRELLA also won’t come cheap -- it’s slated to go on sale in February 2014 at 9450 yen, or about $92.  

For those who just can’t get past the funny-looking wire frames up top the UnBRELLA, there is another option. A designer recently unveiled a very similar inverted umbrella that simply puts a cover over the structural support. 

Watch demos of both products below.


h concept's UnBRELLA 


Ilmo Ahn's "Inverted Umbrella" 

(h/t The Verge)

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