Photographer Janol Apin shoots playful scenes along the platforms.

While traveling along a subway line, our imaginations may take us to strange places. What, we might wonder, would a "Foggy Bottom" or "Cockfosters" actually look like?

Photographer Janol Apin has given us some idea. In Métropolisson, Apin set up amusing, carefully arranged scenes in nearly half of Paris Metro's 245 stations. Each is meant to be a literal depiction of the station name. In Argentine, for example, there are tango dancers. At Château d'Eau (which translates to "Water Tower"), a man desperately reaches for a water cooler. And at Alexandre Dumas, three musketeers put their swords to the air in unison.

Apin tells Fast Company that the idea for the project came during a stop at Richard-Lenoir, when he saw a stranger posing underneath the station sign, causing Apin to think that the man could be Richard himself. Not surprisingly, he eventually came come back to the station with his camera, and a man in a t-shirt that says "Richard."

All images courtesy Janol Apin.

H/T Fast Co. Design

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