ziferblatlondon/Instagram

But the coffee is free.

London just got its first pay-per-minute "anti-cafe." At Ziferblat, the coffee is free. But guests pay 3 pence (about 5 cents) per minute for the privilege of sitting around.

Besides coffeemakers, Ziferblat offers a kitchen, record player, piano, vintage furniture, and of course, Wi-Fi. So if you’re not exactly picky about coffee, $3 for an hour could be a good time.

Russian author Ivan Mitin opened the first Ziferblat in Moscow in 2011. It was so popular that Mitin opened nine additional stores. London is the chain’s first location outside of Russia and Ukraine. But Mitin is already thinking about New York.

Here are a few clips of the new London branch.  

(h/t Grist)

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