Associated Press

So stop complaining.

Remember way back in November 2013, when the world was younger and we were more innocent and all of San Francisco turned into Gotham City for a Batman-loving five-year-old with cancer?

Our hearts were warmed, but when we found out that it cost the city $105,000 to make a child happy, some people were angry. When the milk of human kindness costs the taxpayers money, it suddenly starts to curdle.

Well, now Batkid lovers and haters alike can be satisfied: philanthropists John and Marcia Goldman have paid for the Batkid festivities.

"When we read in your column how the Make-A-Wish Foundation was trying to raise the money to pay back the city for the setup and public safety costs surrounding the event, we thought, 'Wait a minute - they shouldn't have to pay for such a good deed and such an amazing event,'" John Goldman told the San Francisco Chronicle.

As the AP notes, most of that $105,000 went to equipment to broadcast Batkid's activities to the large crowds that turned out to watch him fight crime.

This post originally appeared on The Wire, an Atlantic partner site.

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