Associated Press

So stop complaining.

Remember way back in November 2013, when the world was younger and we were more innocent and all of San Francisco turned into Gotham City for a Batman-loving five-year-old with cancer?

Our hearts were warmed, but when we found out that it cost the city $105,000 to make a child happy, some people were angry. When the milk of human kindness costs the taxpayers money, it suddenly starts to curdle.

Well, now Batkid lovers and haters alike can be satisfied: philanthropists John and Marcia Goldman have paid for the Batkid festivities.

"When we read in your column how the Make-A-Wish Foundation was trying to raise the money to pay back the city for the setup and public safety costs surrounding the event, we thought, 'Wait a minute - they shouldn't have to pay for such a good deed and such an amazing event,'" John Goldman told the San Francisco Chronicle.

As the AP notes, most of that $105,000 went to equipment to broadcast Batkid's activities to the large crowds that turned out to watch him fight crime.

This post originally appeared on The Wire, an Atlantic partner site.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Life

    The Cities Americans Want to Flee, and Where They Want to Go

    An Apartment List report reveals the cities apartment-hunters are targeting for their next move—and shows that tales of a California exodus may be overstated.

  2. photo: a pair of homes in Pittsburgh
    Equity

    The House Flippers of Pittsburgh Try a New Tactic

    As the city’s real estate market heats up, neighborhood groups say that cash investors use building code violations to encourage homeowners to sell.  

  3. Life

    Can Toyota Turn Its Utopian Ideal Into a 'Real City'?

    The automaker-turned-mobility-company announced last week it wants to build a living, breathing urban laboratory from the ground up in Japan.

  4. Equity

    What ‘Livability’ Looks Like for Black Women

    Livability indexes can obscure the experiences of non-white people. CityLab analyzed the outcomes just for black women, for a different kind of ranking.

  5. A photo of a police officer in El Paso, Texas.
    Equity

    What New Research Says About Race and Police Shootings

    Two new studies have revived the long-running debate over how police respond to white criminal suspects versus African Americans.

×