A much more visual and intuitive take.

When New York City designer Nikki Sylianteng got a $95 parking ticket in L.A. recently, she was reminded of a project she started two years ago, which was redesigning a much more visual and intuitive parking sign.

Diagram of Sylianteng's original redesign for a 2-step, timechart-based parking sign -- in which green means park, red means don't park. 

Now back in New York City, Sylianteng decided to make a real prototype and see what people think. Last week, she tested a redesigned sign right on the streets. A few comments left below the sign have been encouraging. 

Sylianteng has also created a project site, where she hopes to build an audience interested in contributing feedback and redesign requests.

She says if she takes this idea to city officials, they'll probably respond with "What about this, what about that." That sounds about right, given all the considerations that went into the city's parking sign redesign effort just last year.

(h/t Business Insider)

All images courtesy of Nikki Sylianteng

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