A much more visual and intuitive take.

When New York City designer Nikki Sylianteng got a $95 parking ticket in L.A. recently, she was reminded of a project she started two years ago, which was redesigning a much more visual and intuitive parking sign.

Diagram of Sylianteng's original redesign for a 2-step, timechart-based parking sign -- in which green means park, red means don't park. 

Now back in New York City, Sylianteng decided to make a real prototype and see what people think. Last week, she tested a redesigned sign right on the streets. A few comments left below the sign have been encouraging. 

Sylianteng has also created a project site, where she hopes to build an audience interested in contributing feedback and redesign requests.

She says if she takes this idea to city officials, they'll probably respond with "What about this, what about that." That sounds about right, given all the considerations that went into the city's parking sign redesign effort just last year.

(h/t Business Insider)

All images courtesy of Nikki Sylianteng

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. A man sits in a room alone.
    Equity

    The World's First Minister of Loneliness

    Britain just created an entirely new ministry to tackle this serious public health concern.

  2. An aisle in a grocery store
    Equity

    It's Not the Food Deserts: It's the Inequality

    A new study suggests that America’s great nutritional divide goes deeper than the problem of food access within cities.

  3. Life

    Amazon Whittles Down List of HQ2 Contenders to 20 Finalists

    The list skews toward larger cities and metropolitan areas along the Eastern corridor, stretching as far north as Toronto and as far south as Miami. And it looks like some of the economic incentives might be paying off.

  4. A small accessory dwelling unit—known as an ADU—is attached to an older single-family home in a Portland, Oregon, neighborhood.
    Design

    The Granny Flats Are Coming

    A new book argues that the U.S. is about to see more accessory dwelling units and guides homeowners on how to design and build them.

  5. Transportation

    On Paris Metro, Drug Abuse Reaches a Boiling Point

    The transit workers’ union says some stations on Line 12 are too dangerous to stop at. What will the city do?