Porsche

It ran on over 1,000 pounds of battery. 

The world's first Porsche hit the streets of Vienna on June 26, 1898. As it turns out, the "Egger-Lohner electric vehicle, C.2 Phaeton model" - P1 for short - has been sitting in a shed in Austria since 1902.

Yesterday, Porsche announced the recovery of the original, unrestored P1, designed and built by Ferdinand Porsche himself. The vehicle ran on over 1,000 pounds of battery and weighed nearly 3,000 pounds total. It reached up to 22 miles per hour and could cover up to 50 miles in overall range.

A Porsche museum spokesperson told Fox News that the vehicle was found in surprisingly good condition. The motor still works, though the batteries, seats, and some of the bodywork are gone. But as the images below show, the beautifully crafted steering wheel, dashboard, and wheels have survived.

After spending over a century in a shed, the P1 will debut this Friday as the centerpiece of the Porsche Museum in Stuttgart, Germany. For the display, the ancient P1’s missing parts will be filled in with translucent blue plastic, a juxtaposition that highlights how far automobiles have come.

(h/t The Verge

All images courtesy of Porsche. 

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