Performed on a London rooftop.

On January 30, 1969, London lunch-goers were treated to an unexpected Beatles concert. That remarkable event was made all the more memorable by this -- it was the band's last show together.

The 42-minute set took place on the roof of 3 Savile Row, the five-story headquarters of the Beatles's record company Apple. As pedestrians and neighbors figured out what was happening, word spread. Soon, crowds filled the street and nearby rooftops.

Metropolitan Police eventually made their way up the building to shut down the show. After nine takes of five songs, the Beatles wrapped the impromptu performance with Paul McCartney improvising the lyrics of "Get Back" to reflect the situation, singing, "you've been playing on the roofs again, and you know your Momma doesn't like it, she's gonna have you arrested!"

The whole scene, from the roof to the street, was captured by a camera crew for the 1970 documentary, Let It Be. The Beatles officially separated the following year.

Here's a clip:

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. photo: a pair of homes in Pittsburgh
    Equity

    The House Flippers of Pittsburgh Try a New Tactic

    As the city’s real estate market heats up, neighborhood groups say that cash investors use building code violations to encourage homeowners to sell.  

  2. Life

    The Cities Americans Want to Flee, and Where They Want to Go

    An Apartment List report reveals the cities apartment-hunters are targeting for their next move—and shows that tales of a California exodus may be overstated.

  3. a photo of a Dodge Challenger
    Transportation

    The ‘Airbnb of Cars’ Gets Heat From the Rental Car Industry

    Peer-to-peer sharing services that let owners rent out their vehicles are a focus of concern from traditional car rental companies, who see disruption ahead.

  4. Equity

    A Visual History of the U.S. Census

    Vulnerable communities are bracing for an undercount in 2020. It’s a familiar story that traces back to the Articles of Confederation.

  5. A photo of a police officer in El Paso, Texas.
    Equity

    What New Research Says About Race and Police Shootings

    Two new studies have revived the long-running debate over how police respond to white criminal suspects versus African Americans.

×