Mark Richardson/Vimeo

Think beach chairs, scooters, and other junk just lying around.

Design lecturer Mark Richardson has assemble a bunch of household items, scrap materials, off-the-shelf components, and some 3D printed parts into a working velomobile - basically a covered trike. 

Some of the items used to build the Fab Velo. (images screenshot from "FAB Velo" on Vimeo)

According to Richardson, "FAB Velo" is an argument for achieving "product longevity" through items that are designed up-front to take on multiple lives.

Here's a demo: 

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