BikeBoards

A simple solution for getting around in the snow.

There are plenty of ski bicycles on the market, but they all require replacing your tires with skis. Colorado company BikeBoards has come up with a much more elegant way to convert your cycle for the snow.

via Facebook

To use the BikeBoard, secure it to the front tire with a pin and strap. Since the bike's wheels and gears stay in place, BikeBoard can easily be removed.

According to Gizmag, the BikeBoard has a full steel edge, some sidecut and curved tips, "providing float in deep snow and grip and carving on harder, slicker snow and ice.”  It works with fat bikes, BMX, and regular 26-inch and 29-inch mountain bikes. The kit for a single BikeBoard will cost $375.

In the past few months, BikeBoards has demoed at expos in Boston, Stockholm, and the Outdoor Retailer Winter Market show in Salt Lake City, Utah. Ski resort operators have reportedly shown interest in opening up hills to BikeBoards, but still have concerns about safety.

Check it out in action:  

Top image via BikeBoards on Facebook 

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