Dennis Hlynsky/Vimeo

The chaotic order of nature's social networks.

We've seen a few efforts to visualize airplane flight paths around the U.S. and the world. But Dennis Hlynsky, a film and animation professor at Rhode Island School of Design, has been tracing the flight paths of birds.

Hlynsky does most of his filming in Providence, Rhode Island, where he's based. He explains via email that because of the brief time these animals assemble - swallows, starlings, and crows congregate for about 15 minutes during sunsets - it's easier to shoot locally.

The birds in these videos are not digitally animated or layered. Hlynsky just uses tools like Adobe After Effects to illustrate each bird's trail. He says ten minutes of original footage will take about 10-15 hours to edit and process.

Here are a few of Hlynsky’s most recent works, which feature starlings and vultures. 

(h/t Colossal)

Top image: Dennis Hlynski's "black vultures" on Vimeo

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