Dennis Hlynsky/Vimeo

The chaotic order of nature's social networks.

We've seen a few efforts to visualize airplane flight paths around the U.S. and the world. But Dennis Hlynsky, a film and animation professor at Rhode Island School of Design, has been tracing the flight paths of birds.

Hlynsky does most of his filming in Providence, Rhode Island, where he's based. He explains via email that because of the brief time these animals assemble - swallows, starlings, and crows congregate for about 15 minutes during sunsets - it's easier to shoot locally.

The birds in these videos are not digitally animated or layered. Hlynsky just uses tools like Adobe After Effects to illustrate each bird's trail. He says ten minutes of original footage will take about 10-15 hours to edit and process.

Here are a few of Hlynsky’s most recent works, which feature starlings and vultures. 

(h/t Colossal)

Top image: Dennis Hlynski's "black vultures" on Vimeo

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Life

    Who’s Really Buying Property in San Francisco?

    A lot of software developers, according to an unprecedented new analysis.

  2. A man checks a route on his phone while in a car.
    Equity

    Conversations With D.C. Uber Drivers Reveal Stress and Debt

    A new report from Georgetown University reveals wage and other challenges faced by Uber drivers in Washington, D.C., yet many say they plan to keep driving.

  3. Equity

    The Hidden Horror of Hudson Yards Is How It Was Financed

    Manhattan’s new luxury mega-project was partially bankrolled by an investor visa program called EB-5, which was meant to help poverty-stricken areas.

  4. Transportation

    Electric Scooters Aren’t a Transportation Revolution Yet

    New data show a staggering rise in shared dockless e-scooter use nationwide. But commuting habits have seen little change since the dawn of micromobility.

  5. The facade of a casino in Atlantic City.
    Photos

    Photographing the Trumpian Urbanism of Atlantic City

    Brian Rose’s new book uses the deeply troubled New Jersey city as a window into how a developer-turned-president operates.