Time travel with art.

A new series of visual mash-ups proves that in London, history is alive in every corner.

Reddit user shystone recently mashed up paintings of London from the 18th and 19th centuries with their modern-day settings in Google Street View. The results encompass several popular landmarks, including Westminster Abbey and the River Thames. Like the film rendition of "London, Then and Now," shystone’s work offers clever insight into how much (or little) London has changed.

Read shystone’s knowledgeable analysis of each remix here.

Westminster Abbey with "Procession of Knights of the Bath" (1749), Canaletto 
The River Thames with "St. Paul's Cathedral on Lord Mayor's Day" (1746), Canaletto 
"Northumberland House" (1752), Canaletto 
"St. Martins in the Fields" (1888), William Logsdail 
"Covent Garden Market" (1737), Balthazar Nebot 
"The Strand Looking East from Exeter Exchange" (1822), artist unknown 
"The 9th of November, 1888" (1890), William Logsdail 
"View of the Grand Walk" (1751), Canaletto 
"Blackman Street London" (1885), John Atkinson Grimshaw 
"A View of Greenwich from the River" (1750-2), Canaletto 

(h/t Visual News)

All images via shystone on Reddit.

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