Jon Burgerman

Jon Burgerman's gruesome takes on New York subway ads.

Ever get the feeling walking through the subway at night that malicious eyes are glued to your back? If so, it could be because a ton of actors on movie posters are pointing guns in your direction, a cultural cliche that's seemingly invaded every single damn action-film promo

Sensing an opportunity, 34-year-old Brooklyn artist Jon Burgerman has launched a gruesome photo project showing himself being executed by these bullet-spitting posters. "Head Shots," as he calls the series, began last summer and has since snowballed into a decent accumulation of blood-spattered shock pics. Don't worry, the fountains of corpuscles aren't real – after obtaining the original image, Burgerman adds copious gore with his special "bad Photoshop skills."

The artist recently took the time to answer a couple questions about the ultra-violent art, as well as provide a few obligatory head shots:

What inspired you to create this series?

I've been interested for a while in making what I term 'quiet interventions,' where our surrounding spaces are tweaked and played with in a fun, easy, cheap, non-permanent way. This can be as simple as taking a photograph that plays with perspective to distort the relationship of scale between two forms.

When I saw a giant poster of Bruce Willis firing a gun in Seoul last summer [ed: see above], I thought I should complete the composition and lie down on the ground beside it as if I'd been shot.

Is it meant as a comment on Hollywood's persistent violence or something else, or is just more of a funny experiment?

It's a funny experiment that will hopefully get people to look again at how our public spaces are being used and what the marketing images around us really say. It's not a comment on the content of movies.

Images used with permission of Jon Burgerman

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. An apartment building in Sacramento, California.
    Equity

    The American Housing Crisis Might Be Our Next Big Political Issue

    Several new advocacy groups have sprung up to push for better housing policies at the state and national level. Their first job: Communicating how significant the problem really is.

  2. Design

    Inside the Secret Cities That Created the Atomic Bomb

    The Manhattan Project, the program that developed the first nuclear weapons during World War II, worked out of three purpose-built cities in Tennessee, New Mexico, and Washington state. A new exhibition considers their design and legacy.

  3. Life

    Where Americans Are Moving for Work

    Most of the top cities are the usual suspects—but there’s something odd happening in Silicon Valley.

  4. New homes under construction in St. George, Utah, in 2013
    Environment

    America's Fastest-Growing Urban Area Has a Water Problem

    As St. George, Utah grows, it will have to cut down on its high water consumption or pay handsomely for it—or both.

  5. A bus stop in the Estonian town of Värska
    Transportation

    Estonia Will Roll Out Free Public Transit Nationwide

    Meet the new world leader in fare-free living.