See if you can spot what went wrong in the media coverage of this Australian demolition.

There's something a little... off in the footage of Thursday's smokestack leveling in Port Kembla, Australia.

Note that it wasn't in the demolition itself. The process, involving 934 explosive holes and destruction of the base for strategic tilting, took down the 650-foot column like clockwork in this town south of Sydney. Rather, the trouble came during this 9 News report on the event. See if you can spot it (note that it's slightly NSFW and posted below). I'll give you...

a...

minute....

Yep, there was a full moon over Australia – just one more in a line of demolition clowns, the winners of whom are still these Glasgow rock musicans who thrashed in front of a dust-vomiting building collapse.

Here's footage of the actual take-down of the 1960s-era tower, which was part of a smelting facility that shut down in 2008 due to local air-pollution concerns. From above:

From a distance:

From way too close:

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