Raw Design

They're made of colorful pool noodles.

With an average winter temperature of 3 degrees Fahrenheit, Winnipeg, Canada, could use a few more pockets of warmth. And now, thanks to the 2014 Warming Huts art and architecture competition, the city’s got some.

Nuzzles, a winning submission from Toronto-based architecture firm Raw Design, looks like blown-up versions of the popular Koosh balls introduced in the 1980s. But instead of rubber, the Nuzzle “huts”  were constructed from a lattice of hollow aluminum tubing and pool noodles.

The horde of noodles help block bitter winds and trap in warm air. People can jump into them, climb on them, and of course, “nuzzle” into the structure for some protection from the cold.

These Nuzzle huts were installed along the Assiniboine River at the end of January. So far, they’ve been particularly popular with children. 

And this is how the Nuzzles were assembled: 

All images courtesy of Raw Design

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