Reconstructing the landscapes in amazing, large-scale detail.

In his travels over the last seven years, Isidro Blasco has made a point of scoping out the places he's visited from an unusually vertical perspective. The New York-based artist has stood on top of some of the tallest buildings in cities like São Paulo, Sydney, and Madrid, taking photos of the iconic skyline from above.

Now, as part of his PLANETS series, Blasco and his studio have reconstructed these city landscapes in amazing, large-scale detail. Attached to pieces of plywood and arrayed in a circle, the photographs allow the viewer to take in a panoramic view with just a single glance.

New York Planet
New York Planet, in progress

The fractured, collage-like nature of the pieces highlight the unique city landscapes in each destination, from the spires of New York to the greenery of Sydney to the older, low-lying architecture of Madrid and Helsinki.

Sydney Planet
Madrid Planet
Helsinki Planet
Helsinki Planet section
Sao Paulo Planet
Alicante Planet

(h/t Design Taxi, images via Facebook)

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