Gus Petro

These blended photographs show us what a crazy building boom along the sleepy, southwest corner of Europe might look like.

For EU officials who dream of solving Portugal's economic woes almost as much as vacationing in the Algarve, these photographs may induce significant drooling.

Gus Petro, who previously blended photographs of Manhattan and the Grand Canyon together, gave himself a similar challenge with Weld. In it, he combines images of central London and the cliffs of southern Portugal into one incredibly dramatic landscape. 

The Zurich-based photographer describes his project as "when the center meets the end point." And he sees his final result as a visual fantasy and ode to Europe's history, a place filled with buildings from a city that "used to be the center of Europe" along an area that, during the Middle Ages, was thought to be where the flat world ended.

Purists who prefer to admire both places for what they are today can look through the initial stages of Petro's project titled Core (London) and Edge (Algarve). But for anyone interested in a place that combines some of Europe's most loved natural and man-made elements (and will surely never exist), Weld is worth a look:

All images courtesy Gus Petro

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