The sports stadium, which is currently being demolished, had a rough start.

The Minneapolis Metrodome is slowly being stripped from the city. Last month, the signature roof was deflated and removed. This weekend, officials blew up the "roof ring" that once anchored it. Soon, construction will start on a new, $975 million dollar stadium on the same site.

Sunday's demolition. Audio of spectator shrieks and freak-outs included.

It's been a long time coming for the outdated stadium. The Twins moved to an outdoor park in 2010 before the stadium's infamous roof collapse late that year, just hours before a scheduled Vikings game (later played in a different city).

The 2010 incident wasn't the first time the air-supported structure misbehaved. Debuting in 1982, the 80s were a cruel decade for the Metrodome's engineers. During construction in 1981, a foot of snow caused it to collapse. A year later, four days before the Vikings's final home game of the 1982 season, it collapsed because of heavy snowfall again.

Workers were able to fix the tear in time for the game, the behind-the-scenes tale recapped dramatically by Howard Cosell just before kickoff:

Four months later, snow caused yet another rip, forcing the Twins to reschedule their game that night. In April 1986, high winds caused a small tear in the roof but it didn't deflate, meaning only a 9-minute delay for that evening's baseball game. The dome started behaving consistently in time for the Twins' first World Series appearance in 1987.

It didn't disrupt another game until 2010.

Things were so good, in fact, that an employee instructional video from the late 1980s didn't even tell new employees what to do in case the dome ripped open and collapsed. There are some other slightly stomach-turning moments though (including one with re-used hot dogs):

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Environment

    Why Flood Victims Blame Their City, Not the Climate

    Cities may struggle to gain support for climate action plans because they haven’t dealt with infrastructure issues that regularly afflict residents.

  2. a photo of a woman on a SkyTrain car its way to the airport in Vancouver, British Columbia.
    Transportation

    In the City That Ride-Hailing Forgot, Change Is Coming

    Fears of congestion and a powerful taxi lobby have long kept ride-hailing apps out of transit-friendly Vancouver, British Columbia. That’s about to change.  

  3. A photo of a police officer in El Paso, Texas.
    Equity

    What New Research Says About Race and Police Shootings

    Two new studies have revived the long-running debate over how police respond to white criminal suspects versus African Americans.

  4. Equity

    No One's Very Good at Correctly Identifying Gentrification

    A new study suggests there's a gap between how researchers think about gentrification and what journalists are telling the public.

  5. a photo of a man at a bus stop in Miami
    Transportation

    Very Bad Bus Signs and How to Make Them Better

    Clear wayfinding displays can help bus riders feel more confident, and give a whole city’s public transportation system an air of greater authority.

×