goCstudio

You'd have to kayak out to use it, though.

Seattle is the kind of city where outdoors nuts move to really get physical, so it makes sense that somebody would want to drop a vapor-spitting sauna right in the middle of one of its scenic coves.

The proposed floating hot-box would be set adrift in Union Bay on air-filled barrels this summer if architectural firm goCstudio obtains Kickstarter funding. The designers' vision is that the sauna will become a sweaty saloon where locals can kick back, take in the view, maybe chat about the enduring awesomeness of Marshawn Lynch. As they explain:

docked in a popular spot, the unit will be able to be accessed by kayak, enabling locals to enjoy their city from a new perspective. facilitating healthy living, the small sauna also provides a relaxing and reinvigorating experience out on the water.

This wouldn't be any ramshackle splinter-hut, presumably. Its specs call for Alaskan yellow-cedar panels and an "efficient" wood-burning stove, as well as a roof deck with a diving board for those who aren't afraid of a little combined-sewer overflow. All that's missing is a minibar, though perhaps somebody could DIY that in the dark of night.

The sailing sauna is not the first idea that goCstudio has had to invigorate Seattle's waterways. The studio has also imagined taking sections of the SR 520 floating bridge and plopping them into Lake Washington to make "spirit pavilions," where people could drift through nature and zone out in "collective meditation."

Have a look at some of the proposed sauna's renderings, including what might be a sweet dragon tattoo in the first one: 

Images by goCstudio via Designboom

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