Soundproof toilets, baby changing stations, and showers, all cleaned by staff after each use.

Finding something as simple as a decent public bathroom in Manhattan can admittedly be a serious pain. But a new company called POSH Stow and Go thinks it's found a better way — for a price.

 

A look at the facilities, (Courtesy of POSH Stow and Go

POSH Stow and Go’s street-level facilities will include soundproof bathrooms, baby changing stations, and luxury showers, all cleaned by staff after each use. They'll also serve as temporary storage rooms, private lockers, and a lounge area with couches and phone-charging stations. 

To join the proposed posh potty club, you’ll have to pay a $15 annual fee, plus $24 for a 3-day package, $42 for six days, or $60 for ten days. Pretty pricey, but at least kids get in free.

The first POSH Stow and Go is planned to open in Midtown this June, but the company hopes to roll out dozens more around Manhattan in the coming year.

(h/t Core77)

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