An elegantly convenient solution to soggy commutes. 

For all-weather cyclists or people who live in rainier cities like Seattle or London, biking without getting soggy toes can be a challenge.

Existing solutions, such as shoe covers and waterproof booties, tend to be inconvenient or clunky. Design student Jillian Tackaberry conceptualized a seamless and stylish alternative, the "Urbanized Cycling Shoe."

Tackaberry's design features cleats for clipless pedals and large Velcro straps. You can pull the ripstop cover over your toes when it rains, and tucked it in when the rain stops.  For greater visibility, Tackleberry also added small LED lights in the heels, which activate when the cleats are clipped in to the pedals.

The images shown here are all 3D-modeled visualizations, but Tackleberry writes via email that a prototype is likely on the way.

(h/t Core77)

All images courtesy of Jillian Tackleberry. 

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