Reuters

Don't even think about wearing a hoodie and pajamas to the fashion-themed "épicerie."

It's hard to imagine Karl Lagerfeld roaming the aisles of a Carrefour for milk and eggs. But based on the fashion show he put together in Paris yesterday, he knows a thing or two about grocery shopping.

The fashion designer transformed the city's Grand Palais into a Chanel-themed food market to display his latest women's collection. Instead of the traditional runway, models strutted down fake shopping lanes, passing items like "Coco Pops" cereal, "Délice de Gabrielle" (a can of tuna based on Coco Chanel's real first name), and some Camembert cheese called "Cambonay," a reference to the Paris street where a Chanel store is located.

Reinventing the traditional fashion setting is nothing new for Lagerfeld, who's staged shows on recreated airplanes, icebergs, and art museums. When asked about this year's theme, he told the New York Times that supermarkets are "something of today’s life and even people who dress at Chanel go there — it's a modern statement for expensive things.” Lagerfeld may have outdone himself, at least until his next show, with the Guardian calling it "arguably his finest runway reimagining to date." 

Before the show, guests were spotted losing their minds over the Chanel-inspired items only to be told by security guards that they had to be left in place. At the end, Lagerfeld announced (as if a manager) that "customers" could take the fruits and vegetables on display.

Oh, and people apparently liked the clothes too.

Models wear creations for Chanel's ready to wear fall/winter 2014-2015 fashion collection presented in Paris, Tuesday, March 4, 2014. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)
(AP Photo/Thibault Camus)
(REUTERS/Stephane Mahe)
A model presents a creation by German designer Karl Lagerfeld as part of his Fall/Winter 2014-2015 women's ready-to-wear collection for French fashion house Chanel at the Grand Palais transformed into a "Chanel Shopping Center" during Paris Fashion Week March 4, 2014. (REUTERS/Benoit Tessier)
(REUTERS/Stephane Mahe)
(REUTERS/Benoit Tessier)
Models present creations by German designer Karl Lagerfeld as part of his Fall/Winter 2014-2015 women's ready-to-wear collection for French fashion house Chanel at the Grand Palais transformed into a "Chanel Shopping Center" during Paris Fashion Week. (REUTERS/Stephane Mahe)
(AP Photo/Jacques Brinon)

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