Roy's People

An artist making humorous miniature scenes is transforming the city into Lilliput.

For months now, Londoners have had to trod with care lest they accidentally crush a bunch of really tiny people. The mini-dudes have been popping up all over the city – lounging inside a flower, examining cigarette butts in CSI garb, whacking a ludicrously regular-sized golf ball into the River Thames.

The wee gatherings are the work of a 27-year-old artist from Essex who goes by "Roy's People" or just Roy. Using a scalpel and paint, Roy whittles the wee homunculi in his studio and then sets out into London (and other places) to find an appropriate setting for them. Then he goes to his Facebook and drops hints of their location to his followers, who set out on a treasure hunt to find them. They seem to enjoy the detective work even when it's a bit arduous, to judge from one Facebook comment: "Really enjoyed marching around Rayleigh stareing in different directions and generally getting lost and confused in my own town. Thank you for an enjoyable evening and our little person!"

As to why Roy is obsessed with turning the U.K. into Lilliput, he told the Other Art Fair:

Tyson describes the responses to the hunts as ‘incredible…the public really enjoy it. It is exciting to see people who take no interest in art suddenly actively searching for it. Each figure is individual and I sign each label so effectively the figure are original works of art. Many ‘winners’ of the hunt send me photos of their discoveries which I then post on facebook to complete the cycle. As an artist, it is great to have feedback on my work and connect with my followers’.

"Roy's People" has a new show opening April 3 at London's Curious Duke Gallery; for folks who won't be able to check it out, the artist has given his blessing to share some photos:

Photos used with permission of Roy's People
 

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. a map comparing the sizes of several cities
    Maps

    The Commuting Principle That Shaped Urban History

    From ancient Rome to modern Atlanta, the shape of cities has been defined by the technologies that allow commuters to get to work in about 30 minutes.

  2. A woman looks straight at camera with others people and trees in background.
    Equity

    Why Pittsburgh Is the Worst City for Black Women, in 6 Charts

    Pittsburgh is the worst place for black women to live in for just about every indicator of livability, says the city’s Gender Equity Commission.

  3. a photo of a full parking lot with a double rainbow over it
    Transportation

    Parking Reform Will Save the City

    Cities that require builders to provide off-street parking trigger more traffic, sprawl, and housing unaffordability. But we can break the vicious cycle.   

  4. Life

    Mapping the Changing Colors of Fall Across the U.S.

    Much of the country won’t see those vibrant oranges and reds until mid-October, which leaves plenty of time for leaf peepers to plan their autumn road trips.

  5. a photo of a child drawing an anti-Amazon protest sign at the Climate Strike march in San Francisco.
    Environment

    Why Climate Strike Protesters Targeted Amazon Go

    Amazon’s automated convenience store became a meeting point—physically and philosophically—for climate and labor protesters on Friday.

×