The latest "Slow TV" hit from Scandinavia.

Since the beginning of March, Norwegian television network NRK has been broadcasting "Piip-Show", a 24/7 online stream that follows the lives of "a short tempered nuthatch, a blue tit with the memory of a gold fish, a happy-go-lucky great tit, and a depressed bullfinch.”

This is the same station that aired seven-hour train rides, minute-by-minute knitting, and other “slow TV” experiments that have become a Norwegian specialty.

via nrkpiip/Instagram

For the next three months, the star ensemble will be inhabiting three different houses, starting with a bird feeder modeled after a well-known local coffee shop, shown below. The network promises plenty of “bickering, petty theft, fighting, and attempts at romance.” 

nrkpiip/Instagram 

As one producer of the Piip-Show told The Guardian, the program’s popularity on Twitter and Instagram has been growing everyday. Even Norway’s Crown Princess Mette-Marit is a fan.

The most dramatic moment so far? Probably when a squirrel crashed the party. Watch that scene here or follow the action live here.

elisaelli/Instagram

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