One photographer's behind-the-scenes look inside this gigantic, high-volume film industry.

Nowadays, Nollywood films are easy to find, whether you're at a market in Lagos or a convenience store in Baltimore. 

The Nigerian-based film industry churns out thousands of movies a year. Usually, the films tell stories that everyday Nigerians can relate to, like the culture around what kind of phone you own, as told in Blackberry Babes, or the country's pervasive corruption, exemplified humorously through the adventures of a very young con artist in Baby Police.

But as Akintunde Akinleye shows on Reuters's "Photographers' Blog," there's a high-brow side to the industry that can get lost in a sea of low budget films. Akinleye spent parts of last year visiting the sets of new movies like October 1, set in the days leading up to Nigeria's independence, and Ake, an adaptation of Nigerian Nobel Laureate for literature Wole Soyinka's childhood memoir:

An actress holds a slate as she performs a scene during the making of "Ake", a film based on the childhood memoirs of Nigerian writer Wole Soyinka, in Abeokuta, southwest Nigeria July 15, 2013. (REUTERS/Akintunde Akinleye) 
A cameraman films a scene from a crane during the making of "Ake" a film based on the childhood memoirs of Nigerian writer Wole Soyinka, in Abeokuta, southwest Nigeria July 14, 2013. (REUTERS/Akintunde Akinleye)
A boy is seen through a camera monitor as he acts in a scene during the making of "Ake", a film based on the childhood memoirs of Nigerian writer Wole Soyinka, in Abeokuta, southwest Nigeria July 16, 2013. (REUTERS/Akintunde Akinleye)
Director Kunle Afolayan watches a monitor while directing a scene during the filming of police thriller "October 1" at a rural location in Ilaramokin village, southwest Nigeria August 24, 2013. (REUTERS/Akintunde Akinleye)
Actors Sadiq Daba (L) and Aderupoko ride bicycles as they perform during filming for "October 1", a police thriller directed by Kunle Afolayan, at a rural location in Ilaramokin village, southwest Nigeria August 24, 2013. (REUTERS/Akintunde Akinleye)
A crew member holds a boom microphone during the filming of "Dazzling Mirage", directed by Tunde Kelani, at a location in the outskirt of Lagos September 9, 2013. (REUTERS/Akintunde Akinleye)
Cast members dressed in traditional attire perform in a scene during the making of "Dazzling Mirage", directed by Tunde Kelani, at a film location in Lagos December 19, 2013. (REUTERS/Akintunde Akinleye)

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