Reuters

The street art surrounding Frankfurt's nearly-finished European Central Bank headquarters is an international draw.

The flashy, €1 billion new headquarters for the European Central Bank in Frankfurt is still a few months away from completion. But the graffiti-covered construction fence surrounding it is already getting lots of attention.

According to a Guardian article, it all started when local social worker Stefan Mohr asked if the children he works with could paint the fencing around the site. The bank said yes, and provided boards for them to paint too.

Being the European Central Bank, the site soon became a magnet for politically charged graffiti, attracting artists from around the continent looking to express their disdain for capitalism, high-profile central bank employees, and politicians. The works attract locals, tourists, and art enthusiasts. The boards are replaced with new pieces every three months.

Ironically, bankers and businessmen have expressed interest in buying some of the works but Mohr tells the Guardian they're not for sale. Once the fencing comes down for good however, they'll be auctioned off to fund other construction site art programs.

One of the paintings, which depicts two fighting roosters, will be displayed inside the building once it opens this summer.

Artists Justus Becker, aka COR (L) and "Bobby Borderline" work on their graffiti mural on a fence surrounding the construction site for the new head quarters of the European Central Bank (ECB) in Frankfurt, March 14, 2014. (REUTERS/Kai Pfaffenbach)
A combination of six pictures shows graffitis painted outside a fence surrounding the construction site for the new headquarters of the European Central Bank (ECB) in Frankfurt, May 16, 2013. (REUTERS/Kai Pfaffenbach) 
(REUTERS/Kai Pfaffenbach) 
(REUTERS/Kai Pfaffenbach) 
(REUTERS/Kai Pfaffenbach)
A graffiti showing two fighting coacks is seen outside a fence surrounding the construction site for the new head quarters of the European Central Bank (ECB) in Frankfurt, March 6, 2013. (REUTERS/Kai Pfaffenbach)
(REUTERS/Kai Pfaffenbach) 

(REUTERS/Kai Pfaffenbach)

(REUTERS/Kai Pfaffenbach)
(REUTERS/Kai Pfaffenbach)  
(REUTERS/Kai Pfaffenbach)
A mural reading "live like god, die as satan" is seen at the fence surrounding the construction site of the new headquarters of the European Central Bank (ECB) in Frankfurt, October 31, 2013. (REUTERS/Kai Pfaffenbach)
A gardener mows the lawn next to the construction site for the new headquarters of the European Central Bank (ECB) in Frankfurt, August 28, 2013. (REUTERS/Kai Pfaffenbach)

Top image: Graffiti is seen on fence surrounding the construction site for the new headquarters of the European Central Bank (ECB) in Frankfurt August 28, 2013. (REUTERS/Kai Pfaffenbach) 

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