Bernard Plossu was the country's Kerouac, telling stories through his seemingly aimless travels.

French travel photographer Bernard Plossu traveled to Mexico for the first time in 1965. Raised on the imagery of French film and Westerns, Plossu was blown away by the landscapes and people he came across, shooting everything he saw during his many return trips.

Plossu began publishing in the 1970s, and turned the bulk of his work into a travel book later that decade. After moving across the border to the U.S. in 1977, Plossu continued this trips across the border. But his later work lacked the Kerouac-ian focus on strangers and settings that make him so special.

Two years after the Museum of Fine Arts in Besancon, France, ran an exhibit of his Mexico photographs, Aperture Books and Mexico-owned Fundación Televisa put together a retrospective titled ¡Vámonos! (scheduled for release this summer). In it, we see the full spectrum of Plossu's work mixed in with stories from friends and contemporaries about the man behind the camera and the importance of the work he did during his visits to Mexico:  

Bernard Plossu, From The North Mexican Tropics,1981, from ¡Vámonos! Bernard Plossu in México (Aperture, 2014)
Mexican Journey, from ¡Vámonos! Bernard Plossu in México (Aperture, 2014)
From The North Mexican Tropics, 1981, from ¡Vámonos! Bernard Plossu in México (Aperture, 2014)
Mexican Journey, from ¡Vámonos! Bernard Plossu in México (Aperture, 2014)
Left: "Journey and Return." Right: "Mexican Journey." From ¡Vámonos! Bernard Plossu in México (Aperture, 2014)
From The North Mexican Tropics, 1981, from ¡Vámonos! Bernard Plossu in México (Aperture, 2014)
The Border, from ¡Vámonos! Bernard Plossu in México (Aperture, 2014)
Mexican Journey, from ¡Vámonos! Bernard Plossu in México (Aperture, 2014)
Bernard Plossu, The Return, from ¡Vámonos! Bernard Plossu in México (Aperture, 2014)
Bernard Plossu, Fresson Color, from ¡Vámonos! Bernard Plossu in México (Aperture, 2014)
Fresson Color, from ¡Vámonos! Bernard Plossu in México (Aperture, 2014)

"¡Vámonos! Bernard Plossu in México" is scheduled to be published June/July 2014. All images copyright Bernard Plossu and courtesy the Aperture Foundation.

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