Nick DiLallo has been aggressively cataloging the digits he sees around the city.

We've all heard of "stop and smell the roses." New Yorker Nick DiLallo chooses, instead, to stop and Instagram the numbers.

For the past few months, the Manhattan-based copywriter has been documenting numbers spotted across the city's street signs, addresses, graffiti, measurements, buses, and subways.

The result is "New York Numbers," an on-going project that reveals a bit about the character of different parts of the city.

In an interview with Boo York City, DiLallo -- who has a degree in economics and mathematics -- compares his project to an exercise in pure math, which ignores physical world applications and focuses on the numbers themselves.

By stripping away the context, DiLallo reveals how differently each number is painted, tiled, glued, or carved. When you look at them together, the result is an astonishing diversity of styles and textures reflective of the city itself.  

Strangely enough, DiLallo says he's yet to find the number 0.

Here’s an overview of what he's captured so far. Head to the Instagram for a closer look at specific shots. And for more New York City numbers, an older Tumblr has gone after a similar concept. 

(h/t LaughingSquid)

All images via @newyorknumbers/Instagram.

About the Author

Jenny Xie
Jenny Xie

Jenny Xie is a fellow at CityLab. 

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